Allergenic Foods and their Allergens, with links to Informall

Molluscan Shellfish

Mollusks
Mollusks

The molluscan shellfish relevant in human diet are gastropods (including abalones, limpets, land and marine snails, whelks), bivalves (including oysters, mussels, scallops) and cephalopods (including squids, octopuses). Increasingly, molluscan shellfish are recognized as important food allergens and have recently been added to the EU list for mandatory labeling of allergens. The prevalence of molluscan shellfish allergy is largely unknown but may parallel consumption patterns, with higher frequency in areas of frequent consumption.

The major allergen of molluscan shellfish is tropomyosin and thus individuals developing allergic reactions to one mollusc species also often react to other species as well. Due to the similarity between invertebrate tropomyosin allergens molluscan shellfish allergic individuals may also react to crustacean shellfish and non-dietary invertebrates (e.g. house dust mite, cockroach).

Molluscan shellfish allergy triggers symptoms ranging from mild local reactions in the oral cavity (oral allergy syndrome) to severe life threatening systemic reactions. Gastrointestinal and respiratory symptoms were occasionally also reported. Shellfish allergens retain their allergenic potential even after heating.

For more detailed information on these foods please follow the links:

Abalone
Abalone, Perlemoen

Abalone, Perlemoen

Horned Turban
Horned Turban

Horned Turban

Limpet
Limpet

Limpet

Sea Snail
Marine Snail

Marine Snail

Blue Mussel
Mussel (Blue Mussel)

Mussel (Blue Mussel)

Green Mussel
Mussel (Green Mussel)

Mussel (Tropical Green Mussel)

Octopus
Octopus

Octopus

Oyster
Oyster

Oyster

Scallop
Scallop

Scallop

Snail
Snail

Snail

Squid
Squid

Squid

Whelk
Whelk

Whelk

 

Updated 10 March, 2014