Allergenic Foods and their Allergens, with links to Informall

Cereals and Grains

Cereals and Grains
Cereals and Grains

 

Allergic reactions to wheat and other cereals are most commonly observed in infants and usually resolves within the first several years of life2.  Symptoms of IgE-mediated allergy to cereals range from mild local reactions of the skin or gut to more serious, occasionally life threatening anaphylactic reactions.

Wheat allergy may also include 
bakers' asthma (occupational exposure to grain flour dust) and, less frequently IgE-mediated allergy associated with exercise, called wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA) . 
Individuals allergic to the wheat related crops (barley, oats, rye) often can tolerate rice. Reactions to rice are rare in Europe and America, but may be more common in Asia.

Celiac disease is a distinct reaction to a protein fraction called gluten which is found in wheat and related cereals such as barley, rye and oats. In particular, the gut of sensitive individual is affected by losing its ability to absorb nutrients. Since there is no cure, life-long avoidance of gluten-containing products is necessary. Due to the extensive use of gluten containing flours in processed foods which might range from baked goods and dairy products (e.g. custard powder) to jams, spreads and beverages, avoidance is a huge challenge to the consumer. In addition gluten may also be used in dietary supplements, cosmetic and pharmaceutical products.

According to the Codex Alimentarius Commission labeling recommendation for pre-packaged food cereals which contain gluten should be labeled as such. There are also special recommendations for "gluten" free foods.

For more detailed information on these foods please follow the links:
 

Barley
Barley

 

Barley

Corn
Corn

 

Corn, Maize

Oats
Oat

 

Oat

Rice
Rice

 

Rice

Rye
Rye

 

Rye

Wheat
Wheat

 

Wheat

 

Updated 10 March, 2014